Click a question to expand and see the answer. Click the question again to close it.

Net metering

 

Solar energy systems typically hit peak electricity production in the afternoon, when many people aren’t home using electricity. By contrast, home electricity use is typically higher in the mornings and evenings. Net metering helps you to account for these ups and downs in your day-to-day electricity production and usage.

With net metering, excess electricity is fed into your electric utility’s grid when your system is producing more than you need. When this happens, your meter actually runs in reverse. When your system isn’t producing enough electricity, you can draw it from your utility just as you did before you went solar. This “back-and-forth” between your system and the grid ensures that your excess production will still be used and your shortages will be met. With net metering, the excess electricity your home produces covers the times when you don’t produce enough.

When your solar power system generates more electricity than you use over the course of a month, your utility bill will receive a credit based on the net number of kilowatt-hours you gave back to the grid. If you produce less electricity than you use in a given month, you must buy electricity from your utility to make up the difference. In these instances, you would pay for the electricity you use, minus any excess electricity your solar panels generated.

 

self consumtion without backup

1

  Solar panels are typically Installed on the roof of the home. These photovoltaic (PV) cells convert sunlight into direct current (DC) power.

2   The inverter(s) convert DC electricity from the solar array to the AC electricity.
3   The inverter feeds electricity into the electrical distribution system of the home network. 
4   Your home remains connected to the utility grid to supply you with electricity when you need more power than your system is producing in the daytime only. the electricity generated from PV are reflected   on your electricity bill as saving.

self consumtion

 

1

  Solar panels are typically Installed on the roof of the home. These photovoltaic (PV) cells convert sunlight into direct current (DC) power.

2   The inverter(s) convert DC electricity from the solar array to the AC electricity.
3   The inverter feeds electricity into the electrical distribution system of the home network.
4   Your home remains connected to the utility grid to supply you with electricity when you need more power than your system is producing in the daytime only. the electricity generated from PV are reflected on your electricity bill as saving.
5   If you install a back system, whick consist mainly of Charger/Inverter and Battery. The charger/inverter(s) convert DC electricity from the Battery to the AC electricity and vice verse to charge the battery.
6   Battery is the storage tank of electricity, the size of the storage Battery determine by how much device power i need and for how long.
   

A detailed and comprehensive solar site assessment is a necessary component for any solar electric installation. A typical site assessment includes the following:
Accurate measurements of roof or ground space including oriantation, access point, chimneys, skylights, cable rout, etc
Shading analysis from proposed location for solar (sometimes several points need to be analysed to determine the best location) – this data is used to provide accurate energy production estimates
Discussion with homeowner to determine route of cable from site of solar electric array to location of inverter/mains panel
Determine location of inverter(s) and integration in to the building’s electrical system.
SOLAMISR will provide preliminary cost, energy production, and Levelized Cost of Electricity numbers specific to your home/building through email as a first step. We would be pleased to provide a free and comprehensive site assessment after this initial step. For new construction residential and commercial projects, SOLAMISR can provide a design and quote directly from the drawings for the building.

Contact us to get started today!

off grid

 

1

  Solar panels are typically Installed on the roof of the home. These photovoltaic (PV) cells convert sunlight into direct current (DC) power.

2

  Here the wiring for the strings of modules are combined into one common wire before going to the DC disconnect. Fuses or breakers for the individual strings are found here.

3  Charge Controller, The charge controller accepts the voltage and current from the solar array and modifies it so as to appropriately charge the batteries. This prevents the batteries from becoming overcharged and becoming damaged. 
4  Battery bank, Flooded lead acid, Gel lead acid, or AGM batteries are typically used as a large storage bank of electricity. Generally 24 or 48VDC for bigger systems, 12VDC for smaller systems.
5  Inverter / Charger,The inverter/charger converts excess DC power stored in the batteries to AC electricity and feeds it into the house. When the power in the grid goes out, the inverter will disconnect from the grid and only feed the backed up loads of the home. This unit also has the ability to convert AC power from a generator to DC to charge the batteries if they become low.
6  Where the power from the grid is split up between all of the different loads for the home. The inverter feeds electricity into the mains panel through a couple of breakers. This electricity goes wherever it is needed, be it in your home.
   

 

 

SCROLL TO TOP